RELATIONSHIP OF REDUCED TRAIN SPEED ON MOOSE-TRAIN COLLISIONS IN ALASKA

Authors

  • Earl F. Becker
  • Carl A. Grauvogel

Abstract

An experiment to test the effect of track site, train speed, direction of train travel, and train run (first versus second round trip of the day), on moose-train collision mortality along the Alaska Railroad in the lower Susitna River Valley of Alaska, was conducted in February 1988. Reduction of train speed from 79 kmph to 40 kmph did not result in a significant reduction in the number of moose hit by trains (P = 0.439), even though the probability of detecting a major reduction was substantial. Significantly more moose were hit on the northern test section than along the southern test section of track (P = 0.095) of the Alaska Railroad.

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Published

1991-01-01

How to Cite

Becker, E. F., & Grauvogel, C. A. (1991). RELATIONSHIP OF REDUCED TRAIN SPEED ON MOOSE-TRAIN COLLISIONS IN ALASKA. Alces: A Journal Devoted to the Biology and Management of Moose, 27, 161–168. Retrieved from https://www.alcesjournal.org/index.php/alces/article/view/1117