MOOSE MOVEMENT AND MORTALITY ASSOCIATED WITH THE GLENN HIGHWAY EXPANSION, ANCHORAGE ALASKA

Authors

  • Michael G. McDonald

Abstract

Moose (Alces alces) movement and mortality were compared prior to and after widening the Glenn Highway near anchorage, Alaska where an 11.3 km section was expanded from 4 to 6 lanes. Thirty eight moose/year reported to be struck and killed in motor vehicle accidents during the 10 years prior to 1987. To mitigate the impacts of the highway upgrade a moose-proof fence, a moose underpass, one-way gates, and highway lighting were installed. From November 1987 through October 1990 moose mortality caused by vehicle accidents declined by 70% overall and by 95% within the fenced portion of the highway when compared to the previous decade. There was no significant decline in the number of moose crossing the highway. Moose tracks indicated substantial movement through the underpass, however, movement across the highway in unfenced portions continued. Use and design of one-way-gates is discussed.

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Published

1991-01-01

How to Cite

McDonald, M. G. (1991). MOOSE MOVEMENT AND MORTALITY ASSOCIATED WITH THE GLENN HIGHWAY EXPANSION, ANCHORAGE ALASKA. Alces: A Journal Devoted to the Biology and Management of Moose, 27, 208–219. Retrieved from https://www.alcesjournal.org/index.php/alces/article/view/1125