PARELAPHOSTRONGYLUS TENUIS IN TERRESTRIAL GASTROPODS FROM WHITE-TAILED DEER WINTER AND SUMMER RANGE IN NORTHWESTERN NEW BRUNSWICK

Authors

  • Heather A. Whitlaw

Abstract

The prevalence of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis infections was compared in terrestrial gastropods from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) summer range and wintering yards in northern New Brunswick during summer, 1995. Of 10,343 snails and slugs examined, only 1 were infected with 1 to 3 P. tenuis third-stage larvae (0.04%); all of these (the snail Discus cronkhitei and the slugs Deroceras laeve and Arion sp.) were collected from the deer yard. The effective frequency of infection in the wintering yard was 0.09% and 0 (undetectable) on summer range. Mean gastropod densities on summer and winter range did not differ (8.3/m2 and 6.2/m2, respectively). We suggest that the higher frequency of infection in the winter yard results from seasonally increased deer usage of these habitat types, and that moose (Alces alces) using such yards during snow-free periods will have increased risk of infection with P. tenuis. The relatively low prevalence of infection observed in gastropod intermediate hosts may reflect the effect of an unseasonably dry spring and some are on the transmission of P. tenuis.

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Published

1996-01-01

How to Cite

Whitlaw, H. A. (1996). PARELAPHOSTRONGYLUS TENUIS IN TERRESTRIAL GASTROPODS FROM WHITE-TAILED DEER WINTER AND SUMMER RANGE IN NORTHWESTERN NEW BRUNSWICK. Alces: A Journal Devoted to the Biology and Management of Moose, 32, 75–83. Retrieved from https://www.alcesjournal.org/index.php/alces/article/view/845